Rising gas prices put pressure on NH nonprofits

As record high gasoline prices continue in New Hampshire, some organizations that help those in need are also feeling the pinch. The average price of a gallon of unleaded gasoline in New Hampshire hit $4.98 on Thursday, the 10th straight day, a record set. High gas prices in addition to existing supply chain issues are causing major problems for New Hampshire nonprofits. “Our food pantries and partner agencies are seeing an increase in the number of people going to the food pantries for food due to the rising cost of food and fuel,” said Nancy Mellitt, director of development at the New Hampshire Food Bank. resources have increased, as have needs. “We are not immune to rising costs as a nonprofit organization,” said Kyle Chumas, Marketing Director of Families in Transition. Chumas’ organization is a housing and homeless service provider that also operates food pantry. “We cook over 600 meals a day,” he said. Chumas said Families in Transition has noticed the effect of high gas prices on deliveries of building and maintenance materials, as well as people’s ability to donate. “As the people who support our organization are impacted, it obviously affects our ability to fundraise and continue to serve the people we serve,” he said. At the New Hampshire Food Bank, Mellitt said there was a 59% increase in fuel. costs, which affected the distribution of food and the collection of food from grocery stores. “We receive no federal or state funding for food distribution,” she said. “So that means relying on the generosity of individuals, companies, grants, etc., to be able to help them meet those needs.” Mellitt said there doesn’t appear to be a shortage of volunteers, but supply chain issues and food costs are a concern, especially as summer approaches. “There is a great need because the children are out of school and they are not getting the free and discounted lunches they usually get during the school year,” she said. And more problems could be ahead. “We’re hearing that starting July 1 there will be another increase in food costs, and that’s cereal, juice and protein,” Mellitt said. Mellitt said there had been a 50% increase in food prices. since last year.

As record high gasoline prices continue in New Hampshire, some organizations that help those in need are also feeling the effects.

The average price of a gallon of unleaded gasoline in New Hampshire rose to $4.98 on Thursday, the 10th straight day a record has been set.

High gas prices in addition to existing supply chain issues are causing major problems for New Hampshire nonprofits.

“Our food pantries and partner agencies are seeing an increase in the number of people going to the food pantries for food due to the rising cost of food and fuel,” said Nancy Mellitt, director of development at the New Hampshire Food Bank.

The cost of food and resources has increased, as have the requirements.

“We are not immune to rising costs as a nonprofit organization,” said Kyle Chumas, Marketing Director of Families in Transition.

Chumas’ organization is a non-profit housing and homelessness service provider that also operates several food pantries.

“We cook over 600 meals a day,” he said.

Chumas said Families in Transition has noticed the effect of high gas prices on deliveries of building and maintenance materials, as well as people’s ability to donate.

“As the people who support our organization are impacted, it obviously affects our ability to fundraise and continue to serve the people we serve,” he said.

At the New Hampshire Food Bank, Mellitt said there has been a 59% increase in fuel costs, which has affected food distribution and food pickup at grocery stores.

“We receive no federal or state funding for food distribution,” she said. “So that means relying on the generosity of individuals, businesses, grants, etc., to be able to help them meet those needs.”

Mellitt said there doesn’t appear to be a shortage of volunteers, but supply chain issues and food costs are a concern, especially heading into summer.

“There is a great need because the children are out of school and they are not getting the free and reduced lunches they usually get during the school year,” she said.

And other problems could be to come.

“We’re hearing that starting July 1 there will be another increase in food costs, and that’s cereal, juice and protein,” Mellitt said.

Mellitt said there had been a 50% increase in food prices since last year.

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